lamardeuse:

calamity-cain:

theblacklacedandy:

cosplaygen:

(via Cosplay - Captain Jack Sparrow by Slava-Grebenkin on deviantART)

YO DUDE I SAW THIS ON DA A FEW WEEKS AGO AND I WAS LIKE “WHY DID SOMEONE SUBMIT SCREENSHOTS OF THE FILM?” BUT THEN I WAS LIKE HO SHIT IT’S A COSPLAY!!!!! THIS PERSON IS PERFECT

this is cosplay

THIS IS COSPLAY

THIS

IS

COSPLAY

how

I’d be perfectly happy to see this guy replace the real Johnny Depp in everything. Just a thought.

(via thetardisnamedsexy)

claudiagray:

Sometimes the greatest sarcasm is wasted. 

(Source: brittapperry, via sharpedlamb)

(Source: cr33pyb0y, via meladoodle)

platimir-vutin:

 

(Source: swiftthefox, via hallowed-weiners)

mythicgeek:

This is never not funny

mythicgeek:

This is never not funny

(Source: thats-so-meme, via cuntlyfex)

The Alnwick Poison Garden is pretty much what you’d think it is: a garden full of plants that can kill you (among many other things). Some of the plants are so dangerous that they have to be kept behind bars. [x]

I want to go tp there

(Source: bregma, via honey-andtar)

(Source: carlboygenius, via uglyitsnot)

nameless-city:

Grýla by Þrándur Þórarinsson 
Grýla, is in Icelandic mythology, a horrifying monster and a giantess living in the mountains of Iceland. She is said to come from the mountains at Christmas in search of naughty children. 
The Grýla legend has been frightening to the people of Iceland for many centuries - her name is even mentioned in Snorri Sturluson’s thirteenth century Edda. Most of the stories told about Gryla were to frighten children – her favourite dish was a stew of naughty kids and she had an insatiable appetite. Grýla was not directly linked to Christmas until in the 17th century. By that time she had become the mother of the Yule Lads. A public decree was issued in 1746 prohibiting the use of Grýla and the Yule Lads to terrify children.
According to folklore Grýla has been married three times. Her third husband Leppalúði is said to be living with her in their cave in the Dimmuborgir lava fields, with the big black Yule Cat and their sons. As Christmas approaches, Grýla sets off looking for naughty boys and girls. The Grýla legend has appeared in many stories, poems, songs and plays in Iceland and sometimes Grýla dies in the end of the story.

nameless-city:

Grýla by Þrándur Þórarinsson 

Grýla, is in Icelandic mythology, a horrifying monster and a giantess living in the mountains of Iceland. She is said to come from the mountains at Christmas in search of naughty children. 

The Grýla legend has been frightening to the people of Iceland for many centuries - her name is even mentioned in Snorri Sturluson’s thirteenth century Edda. Most of the stories told about Gryla were to frighten children – her favourite dish was a stew of naughty kids and she had an insatiable appetite. Grýla was not directly linked to Christmas until in the 17th century. By that time she had become the mother of the Yule Lads. A public decree was issued in 1746 prohibiting the use of Grýla and the Yule Lads to terrify children.

According to folklore Grýla has been married three times. Her third husband Leppalúði is said to be living with her in their cave in the Dimmuborgir lava fields, with the big black Yule Cat and their sons. As Christmas approaches, Grýla sets off looking for naughty boys and girls. The Grýla legend has appeared in many stories, poems, songs and plays in Iceland and sometimes Grýla dies in the end of the story.

(via aezazleza-deactivated20140309)

the-last-enemy:

David Tennant and Matt Smith on The Graham Norton Show

(Source: gallifreyfalls, via getawolf)

(Source: nicemickeymouse)

Men's Fitness: Behind the Scenes - Norman Reedus x

(Source: fuckyeahrickyl, via ataxie)

Arctic Monkeys Snap Out of It
[Flash 9 is required to listen to audio.]
78309 Plays

(via thetardisnamedsexy)

Stuff and Junk